The Internal Revenue Service After the Shutdown

The tax system administered by the IRS will feel the effects of the federal shutdown for a long time. The five-week closure in December and January couldn’t have come at a worse time for the Service, which was gearing up for the 2019 filing season, its first under the new tax law. Some experts are saying it could take the Service up to eighteen months to recover.

During the shutdown, the IRS lost about 125 IT employees, which averages about 25 for each shutdown week. Given the agency’s antiquated computer systems, losing these people is a big deal. Training service workers, especially customer service workers, on the new tax law was also delayed. This will also likely affect the already dismal level of service provided on the IRS’s toll-free helplines. Are you wanting to call the IRS with a question? Be prepared to give personal information about yourself to help customer service representatives confirm your identity. You will have to supply your Social Security number and date of birth, your filing status, and probably data from your prior year return.

There is also a huge mail backlog—over 5 million pieces of unprocessed mail. So if you mailed correspondence to the Service during the shutdown, good luck.

The audit rate for 2019 will plunge, since enforcement was put on hold. The IRS will also have a difficult task of attracting and retaining talented workers, especially millennials. Fear of future shutdowns may lead existing employees to retire early or flee to the private sector, adding to the IRS’s ongoing brain drain problem. Over 33% of IRS employees are over age 55, and only 125 workers nationwide are under age 26. Does this sound good to you? So I must ask, does the federal government seem like the best alternative to run our healthcare system? You will get to decide in 2020.

That is all today. I look forward to visiting with you next week. In the meantime, don’t hesitate to reach out if you have a question—you can call my office at (713) 785-8939, email me at robert@robertstevensoncpa.com, or simply leave a comment on this post. I’d love to hear from you.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s