Deducting Travel, Meals, and Entertainment as a Business

Last week, we discussed how all employee business expenses are non-deductible for individuals on their Form 1040. The only way an individual could be reimbursed (without it being included in his W-2) for an out of pocket business expense would be if his employer had an Accountable Plan, which is when you itemize your business expenses on an expense report, with your receipts attached, and your employer reimburses the exact amount. The bottom line is that the Form 2106, Employee Business Expenses is now obsolete and the Miscellaneous Expenses section of Schedule A, Itemized Deductions is also obsolete.

This week, we will discuss when Travel, Meals, and Entertainment are deductible by a business.

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) completely eliminates the employer (business) tax deduction for entertainment, either paid directly or reimbursed to the employee. But there is one way for a business to get a deduction. If the business pays entertainment expenses on behalf of or by reimbursement to an employee and the amount is included in his Form W-2 as compensation, then the employer may take a 100% deduction as Wages. Otherwise, business entertainment is 100% non-deductible for expenses paid or incurred after December 31, 2017 for both employee and employer. Don’t be surprised if reimbursement policies change.

Business Meals are more complicated. The 50% limitation for business food and beverage expense still applies to meals while traveling away from home on business, and it still applies to business meals with clients as long as it’s not extravagant. Now it also applies to food and beverages provided to employees through an employer-operated eating facility, and to employer-provided de minimis food and beverages at the workplace such as coffee, cokes, donuts, water service, and overtime meals for the convenience of the employer.

The 100% deductible items include travel expenses such as airline tickets, hotels, rental cars, and taxis. Also the office holiday party, the company picnic, and any company provided gathering that lifts employee morale is still 100% deductible. So feel free to plan your company Christmas party and be sure to deduct 100% of your expenses.

Finally, you may want to establish separate general ledger accounts for: Non-deductible Entertainment; 50% Food and Beverage; and 100% Travel and Holiday Party.

That is all today. I look forward to visiting with you next week.

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