Can You Deduct Interest on a Home Equity Loan Used to Remodel Your Home?

In short, yes.

Debt secured by a first or second home and used to improve the place has always been considered acquisition indebtedness, so the new law’s crackdown on home equity loans doesn’t apply. After 2017, you can no longer deduct interest on home equity debt used for other purposes, such as to buy a car, pay off credit card debt, or pay college tuition. Remember when we changed the Texas Constitution to allow borrowing on the equity in your farm, ranch, or home for purposes other than home improvements? It was the early 1990s. Well, you can still borrow on your equity for other purposes, you just can’t deduct the interest.

There is also a new limit on eligible acquisition mortgage debt. The new law limits the deductibility of interest on acquisition indebtedness to $750,000 for tax years after December 31, 2017. The new law allows homeowners with existing mortgages to continue to deduct interest on a total of $1 million of debt for a first and second home, but for new buyers, the $1 million limit fell to $750,000 for a first and second home.

When it comes to refinancing your mortgage, homeowners can refinance mortgage debt up to $1 million that existed on December 14, 2017, and still deduct the interest. But the new loan cannot exceed the amount of the mortgage being refinanced, unless used to improve your home.

Example: If Joe has a $1 million mortgage he has paid down to $800,000, then he can refinance up to $800,000 of debt and continue to deduct interest on it. If he refinances for $900,000 and uses the $100,000 of cash to upgrade the home, then he could deduct the interest on the $900,000. But if he uses the $100,000 for other purposes, such as paying off credit card debt, then he couldn’t deduct interest on any of the $900,000 refinancing. I hope this helps.

That is all for today. I look forward to visiting with you next week.  In the meantime, don’t hesitate to reach out with questions.

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