Welcome to Tax Season! Details on the New 199A Deduction

Tax season has begun. This week, I examine a new section to the Internal Revenue Code that intends to give some degree of parity to certain types of small businesses—you can find the details below.

The New Section 199A Deduction

Congress added a new section to the Internal Revenue Code. Section 199A is intended to give some degree of parity to small businesses that operate as partnerships, S corporations, sole proprietorships, trusts, publicly traded partnerships, and REITS. Since C corporations are now taxed at 21%, Congress decided to give small flow-through businesses taxed at the higher individual level a break. The deduction is limited to the lower of 20% of Qualified Business Income or 20% of the individual’s taxable income.

If you are a Service Trade or Business, i.e. health, law, accounting, actuarial services, performing arts, consulting, athletics, financial services, brokerage services, or any other trade or business that relies on the reputation or skill of one or more of its employees, then your deduction is only allowed if your taxable income is below $315,000 if filing MFJ and $157,500 for all others.

For businesses other than service—businesses whose owners have taxable income above the phase out limit of $415,000 for MFJ and $207,500 for all others—there are deduction limitations based on W-2 wages and depreciable assets. It is a little complicated, but it is a great deduction.

Tax Season Has Begun

The IRS has begun accepting 2018 tax returns and is issuing refunds. Now is the time to begin gathering your tax data and making an appointment with your tax preparer. If you need a tax preparer and would like to use our firm, then do not hesitate to give me a call and we will set an appointment for you.

That is all today. I look forward to visiting with you next week. In the meantime, don’t hesitate to reach out if you have a question—you can call my office at (713) 785-8939 or leave a comment on this post. I’d love to hear from you.

Happy New Year – Remember to File Your Personal Income Tax Return

I hope everyone had a restful and spiritual holiday season. As you know, it is my job to remind you that the New Year brings about your renewed responsibility to file your personal income tax return. It will be due on April 15, 2019. Also due on April 15 are your Trust returns on Form 1041 and your C Corporation returns on Form 1120. On March 15, 2019, your S Corporations on Form 1120S and your Partnerships on Form 1065 are due. These deadlines can all be extended.

You may also want to know that your Property Renditions are due to the HCAD by April 1, 2019 and your Texas Franchise Tax Reports are due to the State Comptroller by May 15, 2019. I probably don’t need to tell you that your payroll reports, which include your W-3, W-2s, Form 941, Form 940, and your TWC Report are due at the end of January.

I Want To Help You Understand the New Tax Law

I would like for you to consider having me come to your business to give a short (hour or less) seminar on the new tax law to your employees. I would talk about how the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act affects your business in particular and how it affects your employees. There are many changes that will seriously impact many taxpayers, and this would be a great opportunity to educate them. Afterward, we could have a Q&A session. We can discuss the content that would benefit your employees. There would be no obligation and it would be free.

That is all today. I look forward to visiting with you next week. In the meantime, don’t hesitate to reach out if you have a question—you can call my office at (713) 785-8939 or simply leave a comment on this post. I’d love to hear from you.

What Should Texas Do About Sales Tax – The Wayfair Decision

In 1992, the US Supreme Court ruled in North Dakota v Quill that a physical presence test must be met for a state to charge sales and use tax. Online sales by retailers with no nexus in a state were not required to charge sales tax.

That may change very soon.

On June 21, 2018 the US Supreme Court ruled in South Dakota v Wayfair that states can impose a sales tax on out of state retailers, even those that do not have a physical presence in the state. It leaves the decision to the various state legislatures: Do they stay with the Quill decision and forego millions in sales tax revenue, or do they adopt the Wayfair decision and require the out of state seller to collect and remit the sales and use tax? In 1992 online sales were in the millions and now they are in the billions and states and cities want the revenue. There will probably be a threshold for small retailers that will exempt them from sales tax reporting similar to Quill if annual sales are (for example) less than $100,000 or they have less than 200 transactions. Also, can you imagine filing and paying 50 sales tax returns every quarter (or month)? What should Texas do?  Should we lower the state rate?

In Houston, we pay sales tax at an 8.25% rate. The state portion is 6.25%, the city portion is 1.00%, and the MTA (Metropolitan Transit Authority) portion is 1.00%.

I support charging sales tax on online purchases because it will help level the playing field.

I believe this will broaden the base and allow for a reduction in the rate.

I will keep you posted.

That is all today. I look forward to visiting with you next week. In the meantime, please don’t hesitate to reach out if you have a question. You can call my office at (713) 785-8939.