Happy New Year – Remember to File Your Personal Income Tax Return

I hope everyone had a restful and spiritual holiday season. As you know, it is my job to remind you that the New Year brings about your renewed responsibility to file your personal income tax return. It will be due on April 15, 2019. Also due on April 15 are your Trust returns on Form 1041 and your C Corporation returns on Form 1120. On March 15, 2019, your S Corporations on Form 1120S and your Partnerships on Form 1065 are due. These deadlines can all be extended.

You may also want to know that your Property Renditions are due to the HCAD by April 1, 2019 and your Texas Franchise Tax Reports are due to the State Comptroller by May 15, 2019. I probably don’t need to tell you that your payroll reports, which include your W-3, W-2s, Form 941, Form 940, and your TWC Report are due at the end of January.

I Want To Help You Understand the New Tax Law

I would like for you to consider having me come to your business to give a short (hour or less) seminar on the new tax law to your employees. I would talk about how the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act affects your business in particular and how it affects your employees. There are many changes that will seriously impact many taxpayers, and this would be a great opportunity to educate them. Afterward, we could have a Q&A session. We can discuss the content that would benefit your employees. There would be no obligation and it would be free.

That is all today. I look forward to visiting with you next week. In the meantime, don’t hesitate to reach out if you have a question—you can call my office at (713) 785-8939 or simply leave a comment on this post. I’d love to hear from you.

Attention Small Business Owners: Don’t Forget Your Franchise Tax Report

Everyone seems to remember their federal tax returns, but for small business owners, state tax returns are also due. If you have a small business and you filed Articles with the Secretary of State to get state law protection in some form, such as an LLC, or a corporation, or another form of protection suitable to your needs, then you will need to file a Texas Franchise Tax Report and a Public Information Report by May 15, 2018.

These reports must be filed electronically and to file electronically you must have your Webfile Number. The Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts sent you a reminder last week that your Franchise Tax Report is coming due. This reminder will have all the information your CPA (or you) will need to file the return electronically, including your Webfile Number. Please be sure to keep this form and get it to your CPA as soon as possible along with your federal tax information — and definitely before May 15.

Effects of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act on the Wealthy

Let’s discuss the impact the new tax law will have on two high levels of income. The first example is an attorney making $500,000 who is married with no children. In 2017, the household will have itemized deductions made up of state and local taxes of $37,285, home mortgage interest of $39,000, and business expenses exceeding 2% of AGI of $10,000. Their itemized deductions will be $80,699 after the Pease deduction (this is a stealth tax from the ACA). Their personal exemptions are totally phased out. Their taxable income will be $419,301 and their regular tax will be $113,638, but their AMT will be $122,671. The effect of the additional Medicare tax from the ACA will not be considered because it is the same in 2017 and 2018. In 2017, their tax liability will be $122,671.  

In 2018, if our same family makes $500,000, then they will have state and local taxes limited to $10,000, they will get all their home mortgage interest of $39,000, and their business expenses from Form 2106 are no longer deductible. Personal and dependent exemptions are repealed.  Their taxable income will be $451,000 and their regular tax liability will be $109,229. AMT is less than the regular tax because the AMT exemption is greater and doesn’t begin to phase out until $1M for couples. Their 2018 tax liability is $109,229. This is a tax savings of $13,442 or put another way, a savings of 11% from 2017 to 2018.

In our second example, we have a married couple with no children. They file jointly and in 2017 they make $1,500,000. They live in beautiful, sunny California and they own their home. Because beautiful California has a 13.3% state income tax and they own their home, they will have $300,000 in state and local tax; they also have $39,000 in home mortgage interest, and their Form 2106 Employee Business Expenses do not exceed 2% of AGI. After the Pease deduction, their itemized deductions are $303,414, their exemptions are phased out and their taxable income is $1,196,586.  Their regular tax liability is $419,079. AMT is not even in the picture.

In 2018, the same family making $1,500,000 will have taxable income of $1,451,000.  Remember SALT deductions are limited to $10,000 plus home mortgage interest of $39,000, and personal and dependency exemptions were repealed. Their tax in 2018 will be $476,249. This is a tax increase of $57,170.  

Please remember that there are those who oppose any type of tax cut for the American people. For most Americans the new law is a tax cut, especially if you live in a low-tax state like Texas. But if you live in a high-tax state like California or you own expensive real estate, then you will very likely have a tax increase. In my experience, most high income taxpayers own a successful small business and they use any tax savings to hire someone young and tech savvy to make their business more efficient. Remember, the American people can allocate their capital and spend their money more equitably and efficiently in the marketplace than the federal government, which is wasteful, inefficient, and inclined toward political favors for special interests.      

That is all today. I look forward to visiting with you next week. In the meantime, please let me know if you have a question. You can call my office at (713) 785-8939 or leave a comment on this post. 

3 Common Tax Return Myths

Nobody wants to be the target of an IRS audit. Fear of an audit leads taxpayers to believe myths about what may or may not catch the eyes of the IRS. Unfortunately, these misconceptions could steer taxpayers toward greater audit risk and a higher tax liability. Below, I unpack three widespread individual tax return myths — and reveal the truth behind them.

Myth #1: Extending an Individual Return Increases Your Chances of Being Audited

The IRS offers an automatic six month extension to all individuals with no explanation necessary. If the IRS viewed extended returns as risky, then there would be rules in place to restrict extensions. Quite the opposite is true — the IRS makes it very easy for individuals to file extensions.

Individuals may rush to file their personal returns out of fear that they will be penalized for an extension, even if their returns are incomplete or inaccurate. This behavior may result in higher audit risk if the IRS catches the inaccuracies. Instead, taxpayers should take the time to collect and review their tax information to ensure they have included everything. If that involves filing an extension, then it is better to extend than to file without all of the information.

While an automatic extension extends your time to file your income tax return, it does not extend the time you have to pay your tax. If you expect to owe additional money with your income tax return, then you will need to pay all tax due when you file your extension.

Myth #2: Getting a Large Refund Means You Are Maximizing Deductions and Minimizing Risk

A large income tax refund may simply mean that you are over withholding on your Form W-2 or overpaying your estimated taxes. That refund is actually interest-free money that you overpaid to the government.

Be leery of those who brag about their IRS Refunds. Rather than optimizing deductions, they may be getting back money that they had over withheld. Discuss your personal circumstances with your CPA to ensure that you maximize your deductions.

Large refunds have now become potential red flags for the IRS. With the drastic increase in identity theft, the IRS is now on the lookout for returns seeking large refunds to ensure that those returns are legitimate.

Myth #3: Individuals Should Not Take the Home Office Deduction Due to Audit Risk

Unlike in the past, working from home is very common today due to technology and the savings to companies in office space. Therefore, remote employees and the self-employed do not necessarily increase their audit risk.

There are some rules to consider. First, individuals can only claim space used exclusively and regularly for business. Also, the home office deduction is available only to individuals who do not have nearby access to a physical office location. Also, the deduction is only allowed to the extent of profit in the business.


If you have additional tax questions, give me a call at (713) 785-8939. I’d love to hear from you.